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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  January 22, 2018 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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showing the strain — the frontline nhs staff struggling to cope, as the winter keeps piling on the pressure. we've spent four days filming in a&e at a hospital in the north east of england — one that has some of the best waiting times. but even there, patients like 83—year—old blanche are left in pain on trolleys in the corridor because there aren't enough beds. they're marvellous these two men, they've never left me. i'm in agony. the staff at north tees hospital say they are doing the best they can, but they just can't cope with the numbers coming for help. worked for the trust for 19 years. never known it be as bad as it is now. there's not the capacity, we don't have the capacity to safely look after the amount of patients coming through the door. we'll be asking how much more the nhs can take? also tonight. on trial for murder and attempted murder — a court hears darren osborne drove into a crowd near a north london mosque because he wanted
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to kill muslims. the 8—year—old girl stabbed to death in her home. a man — understood to be herfather — has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. the head of the army warns that britain's military may struggle to respond to future threats without more money. and another royal wedding at windsor this year. princess eugenie is engaged to her long term boyfriend jack brooksbank. coming up on sportsday on bbc news. northern ireland boss michael o'neill turns down the chance to become the new manager of scotland — saying it's not the right opportunity at this moment. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. there's fresh evidence tonight of the intense strain hospitals across the uk are under, as the nhs struggles to deal
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with winter pressures. we've spent four days the university hospital of north tees in the north east of england. the a&e department there has some of the best waiting times in england, even though the trust is rated as "requiring improvement". our team witnessed patients waiting for hours to be treated, trolleys in corridors and ambulances backed up. medical staff at the hospital say it doesn't have the capacity to look after safely all the patients coming through the door. the trust says pressures are "immense". from stockton, our special correspondent ed thomas has this report. inside the nhs. for the first time this winter, we have within given full access to a hospital.” this winter, we have within given full access to a hospital. i have worked for the trust for 19 year, i have never known it to be as bad as it is now. over a weekend, we spoke
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to patients. supposed to be the best country in the world. we are nowhere near the best country in the world. progressively getting worse. definitely. met staff, facing unprecedented pressure we have no rooms in the a&e department so these patients are waiting here for the next available bed. how do you describe the nhs?m feels like it is lost. it is com pletely feels like it is lost. it is completely under strain, bursting at the seams. what it is like being on the corridor? i think it's a disgrace. the university hospital of north tees. it has some of the best a&e waiting times in england. but with was so full at one point many month had to close its doors. it's friday and we are in the rapid
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assessment unit. i'll do this one. it used to be the hospital's gym. assessment unit. i'll do this one. it used to be the hospital's gymm is hot, it is because the windows are at the top. it is like stepping offa are at the top. it is like stepping off a plane abroad. that is what it's like, the heat hits you. are you comfortable there patients with less severe symptoms can be sent here instead of a&e. less severe symptoms can be sent here instead of me. dawn has worked here instead of me. dawn has worked here for nearly 20 years, this has been her busiest winter yet. here for nearly 20 years, this has been her busiest winter yetm here for nearly 20 years, this has been her busiest winter yet. it is exhausting mentally and physically, trying to keep up with everything we need to do in the short space of time we have to do it in. it can be ha rd time we have to do it in. it can be hard and tiring, but i do love my job. we'll get you there. some patients spent up to six hours here. average waiting times are not included in the hospital's a&e figures. how many trolleys have you got in here? 12. how many figures. how many trolleys have you got in here?- how many patients? 18. how many more to come in? nine.
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another nine to come in. about to two hours before you get your results. they don't have the time to look after patients and do their own jobs and everything everything. it is terrible. the nurses get upset, don't they. they really do get upset. i think the nurses deserve better. the nurses couldn't do any more. we need a proper area for rapid assessment. if the patients weren't here, where would they be? in a&e. on saturday, a&e is filling up. the rapid assessment unit in the gym is closed. lady out of 12 is going into nine. and leanne, the nurse in charge must find space. more coming through the door, more elderly patients, more poorly patients. what are your concerns? there is not the capacity, we don't have the capacity to safely look after the
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patients coming through the door. by patients coming through the door. by 4.00, ambulances are backing up outside a&e. inside... paramedics wait with their patients. she's looking after me lovely. i'm doing well. i'm in pain but coping. blanche is 83. and she is struggling to breathe. they're marvellous these two men. they've never left me. i know. i'm in agony. she is in discomfort and pain. being here is not where she needs to be. we have given her what we can in
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terms of pain leaf. what does she need? she needs to be seen by a doctor. that's it. paramedics told us they wa nted that's it. paramedics told us they wanted with her for an that's it. paramedics told us they wanted with herfor an hour. when you see that lady down there for an hour... it's awful. we don't like it. nobody likes the patients to be in the corridor, but i physically have no room to put this lady in, i have no room to put this lady in, i have been down and apologised, but, there is no physical bed to transfer this lady into. across the nhs, emergency admissions are at record levels. you are doing fantastic. what do these... they are amazing. te nfold, what do these... they are amazing. tenfold, they are amazing. many
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hospitals are also facing a major flu outbreak. what has this place meant to you? she wouldn't be here. she said herself she thinks she would be dead if itted hadn't been for the doctors. here, it means by sunday, every bed on every medical ward is full. we are trying to move patients from orthopaedics to create capacity. it is denise job to find beds. hello. to keep patients moving through the hospital. we can always wa nt through the hospital. we can always want more beds and more staff, but you can't go on foreverjust using more beds and staff, we have to look at the other reasons they come in hospital. patients that are in trolleys on corridors are rare within the trust. my concern is that the year on year increase in the patients and number coming to a&e is not sustainable. we need to transform our
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not sustainable. we need to transform oui’ ca re. not sustainable. we need to transform our care. from friday to sunday, the hospital failed transform our care. from friday to sunday, the hospitalfailed to meet its a&e four hour waiting targetlj am going to check the floor. the avenue “— am going to check the floor. the avenue —— averaged 85%, well below the 95% target. avenue —— averaged 85%, well below the 9596 target. we are losing a lot of experienced staff, because they are becoming burned out. they are realising they can't keep going like this. just discharging but when you discharge... it has been nonstop. we haven't been able to give them a drink. how does that make you feel? frustrated and sad i would say fwlsm can you go on doing this? no. not just me personally. you have had a few more years than me and i don't think i can. how long few more years than me and i don't thinki can. how long do few more years than me and i don't think i can. how long do you think you can stick it out for? at this moment in time i have probably got about five years left, tops. so far my career has been four years long.
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i wouldn't say i would do a long career in the nhs. step back before you sit down. with our ageing population, more patients with complex acute conditions, more nurses, leaving the joining in england last year, many wa nt to joining in england last year, many want to know how the nhs can continue to cope. come this time next year this will happen again and again and again and again. and we will see all this pictures in the news, and the horrendous trolley waits, and it doesn't seem to change. horrendous trolley waits, and it doesn't seem to change. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here. distressing scenes there. 83—year—old blanche on a trolley in pain for example — thankfully she's back home now. but how representative is that of uk hospitals as a whole? well, i think it is sophie. particularly the fact under great pressure the nhs can deliver safe
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quality care, thanks to dedicated staff and patients like blanche can get home. it illustrates that staff are feeling under huge strain, they have never seen anything like it, previous winters haven't been as bad as this. as we heard some are considering leaving their careers early, if this continues. that is a real workforce charge, we learned last week that more nurses are leaving thanjoining last week that more nurses are leaving than joining the last week that more nurses are leaving thanjoining the nhs in england, the government says it has put more money into creating more places for more nurse, it has put more money into english a&e units to help with the pressures this winter. what we also learned is there is confusion over the stats, so important to try to work out how well or not the nhs is doing. we learned there that the rapid assessment unit with patients waiting up to six hours isn't included in that hospital statistic, we have also learned other hospitals are including different minor injury centres often run by other provide ires which is very confusing. the uk stats watchdog said it wants
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to look into this, because it thinks it is all seriously misleading for patients. it is all seriously misleading for patients. a court has heard that a man who drove a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in north london last year wanted to kill as many muslims as possible. the jury was told that 48—year—old darren 0sborne, who's accused of killing one man and attempting to murder others in an act of terrorism, had decided to take matters into his own hands after growing angry following the manchester and london attacks. he denies murder and attempted murder. daniel sandford reports. the pandemonium on a summer night in north london after a large box van smashed into a crowd of worshippers at speed, leaving them strewn across the pavement, some with life—changing injuries. and leaving 51—year—old makram ali dead. today his family were at
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woolwich crown court to watch as 48—year—old darren 0sborne from cardiff went trial. jonathan rees qc for the prosecution said 0sbourne deliberately drove into a group of muslims trying to kill as many as possible. the prosecution say darren 0sborne became enraged after a bbc drama about sexual abuse by pakistani men in rochdale, and by the attacks on london and manchester. his partner said he was a ticking time bomb who followed will on twitter tommy robinson the founder of the far right group the edl. the day before the attack he hired a large van. that saturday evening darren 0sborne came here to his local pub, and the prosecution say that witnesses remember him writing on a piece of paper, and then becoming increasingly loud and abusive about muslims. prosecution say that after the attack a misspelled note was found in the cab of the van 0sbourne hired. part of it reads:
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the prosecution say that this pro—palestinian march may have been darren 0sborne's original target, but when that didn't prove viable he instead started looking for mosques. their case is it was an act of terrorism designed to intimidate the muslim community. police have arrested a man who's thought to be the father of an 8—year—old girl who died after being stabbed on saturday night. 54—year—old bill billingham is in a critical condition after he was found with a stab wound in his stomach. sima kotecha reports. eight—year—old mylee billingham, described as a little angel. she was stabbed to death at the weekend. tributes lay outside the bungalow in the area of brownhills, near walsall.
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it's where police were called to, just after 9.00pm on saturday. mylee was found inside with serious injuries. she was rushed to hospital, but police say medics were unable to save her. she died a short time later. some of those living nearby are distraught. i only live round the corner and i heard the sirens, and i couldn't believe it. it was such a shock to everyone. a 54—year—old man was arrested yesterday on suspicion of attempted murder. the bbc understand he is bill billingham, mylee's father. he was taken to hospital with a serious stab wound to his stomach, and is said to be in a critical condition. at mylee's school, the head teacher had this to say. everyone at the school is completely devastated. mylee was dearly loved by us all. her smile lit up the room — in fact it never left her face. she was a fun—loving, happy, eight—year—old, who had her whole life in front of her. she took a full part in school life,
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particularly enjoying singing and performing. she was just a lovely girl. our hearts go out to herfamily at this difficult time. police are treating what happened as a domestic incident, and say they are not looking for anybody else. in this community, it's been traumatic as they've had to come to terms with losing their little angel, taken too soon in a tragic way. sima kotecha, bbc news, brownhills. our top story this evening. 0n the front line nhs staff are under intense strain across the uk, as hospitals struggles to deal with winter pressures. also tonight... a perfect interception. tributes to the footballer, jimmy armfield, who's died aged 82. coming up on sportsday on bbc news. dreams do come true for the world number 58 from korea, heung chung, as he shocks the six time winner novak djokovic to reach the australian open quarter—finals.
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one in three young women in the uk are avoiding smear tests for cervical cancer, because they're too embarrassed to show their bodies to doctors according to a charity. it also says cervical cancer screening rates have fallen to a 20—year low. two thousand women took part in the survey — it found that more than a third of women are failing to get tested because of their body shape. 3k per cent were worried about getting undressed in front of a doctor or nurse. and the majority of those questioned weren't aware that cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35. here's our correspondent, lorna gordon. the abnormal cells that indicate the presence of cervical cancer. it is a disease that can be caught early by a smear test. but for most of her
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20s, lauren bene avoided having it done even though she was getting co nsta nt done even though she was getting constant reminders from her gp. there were quite a few reasons that prevented me from doing it. i was nervous about what the medical professionals might think itjust by looking at me, i thought about the underwear i would wear, were i would put it when i took it off. picked up severely abnormal precancerous cells, she has had treatment and been given the all clear. the aim of the smear test is to pick up any changes in a cervix, the cells at the neck of the womb.
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it takes a few minutes and in most instances it is carried out by a nurse ina instances it is carried out by a nurse in a space like this. and yet some women do not turn up for the cheque. virtually all of my patients feel the need to apologise to me, i am sorry feel the need to apologise to me, i am sorry i did not shave, or had a shower yesterday and my answer is, i do not think about that, i am here to do do not think about that, i am here todoa do not think about that, i am here to do a job. and that is that. this survey suggests there is a particular reluctance among younger women, those under 35 to get the test done. if women are being put off attending screening, there will be a risk of more women being diagnosed and potentially losing their lives, it is imperative we find ways that make it more accessible for women to attend screening when invited and also that they understand what the testers for. cervical cancer is largely preventable and the message to women is not to let embarrassment stop them from getting a simple test which could end up saving their lives. laura gordon, bbc news, glasgow. the ukip leader henry bolton says he won't quit despite several members of the party's ruling body resigning in protest over his relationship with his ex—girlfriend.
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she has apologised after being accused of sending racist text messages. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is in folkestone where mr bolton was speaking a short time ago. and he was adamant he wasn't quitting? that is right. henry bolton was bullish when he emerged earlier in defiance of those in his party who are calling for him to stand down over this episode concerning his now ex—girlfriend. the ruling body has decided in a boat of no confidence in him and now a dozen members of his top team have resigned, but today he insisted he was going nowhere saying it was time to end the infighting, time to drain the swamp, using the donald trump phrase. he wants to reform party structures and he is banking on the support of another party members to keep him in place when they meet in a few weeks' time to decide his
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fate. in the meantime, a statement has instead risked deepening divisions. thank you. the head of the army says the government must invest more in the armed forces or risk falling behind ‘potential enemies.‘ in a speech in the last hour, general sir nick carter said britain would struggle to match russian capabilities on the battlefield. his comments have been approved by the defence secretary gavin williamson — and come amid speculation that the military is to face more cuts. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale reports. russia is building an increasingly modern and aggressive military. already tested in battle in syria, using weapons britain would struggle to match, like long—range missiles. in ukraine they have been using unconventional warfare, electronics, cyber and misinformation. and they are even on manoeuvre on europe's doorstep. with large—scale exercises near to the borders. enough to worry the head of the british army, who tonight gave this rare public warning. i believe our ability to pre—empt or respond to these threats will be eroded if we do not match up to them now. they represent a clear and present danger. they are not thousands of miles away, they are now on europe's doorstep. the uk is already seriously
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outnumbered, russia has more than 2500 tanks, among them the most advanced in the world. in contrast, britain has fewer than 300 and the uk's challenger tank, here on an exercise, is now over 20 years old. this intervention by the head of the army is as much an appeal for more money for defence as it is a warning about the threat posed by russia. over the next ten years, the ministry of defence needs an extra £20 billion to modernise the armed forces and without that money, they could face another round of brutal cuts. so how does britain's defence spending compare? last year its budget was £35 billion. while russia's was £41; billion. but the uk is still part of the nato alliance who together spent £657 billion, including a us defence budget of a43 billion.
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this is not only about russia, it is also about our european allies and the united states. we need to show to our nato allies that we are taking russia seriously and that we intend to maintain ourselves as a serious military power. the defence secretary has sent his top brass into battle to persuade the chancellor to give him more money, but they are competing with other demands and other departments and defence may not be the top of the list. jonathan beale, bbc news. two men have been sentenced to at least 3a years each after being found guilty of murdering a businessman in an attempted burglary at his home in dorset. guy hedger was shot dead last april by kevin downton and jason baccus, who committed burglaries to fund their drug habits. a third man, scott keeping, was acquitted. the manufacturer of an ejector seat which caused the death
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of a red arrows pilot has admitted breaking health and safety laws. flight leftena nt sean cunningham died in 2011 when he was ejected — without warning — from hisjet while it was parked on the ground at raf scampton. the queen's granddaughter, princess eugenie, is engaged to her longterm boyfriend, jack brooksbank. the second royal wedding of the year — will take place in the autumn at st george's chapel, windsor. the 27—year—old, who got engaged on holiday in nicaragua this month, told the bbc of the moment her fiance proposed. the lake was so beautiful, the light was such a special light i have never seen. i actually said, this is an incredible moment. and then he popped the question. which was really surprising, even though we have been together for seven years. so... right. i was over the moon. the happy couple. he played more than 600 matches for blackpool, he captained england and was even part of the victorious 1966 world cup squad — today tributes have been pouring
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in forjimmy armfield who has died at the age of 82. after he retired from the game — the former blackpool captain spent more than 30 years working as a bbc pundit. 0ur sports correspondent, david 0rnstein, looks back at his life. jimmy armfield was as likeable on the football pitch as he was in the commentary box and beyond, starting out in 1954 with blackpool, he played there until retirement, 627 games, many of them as captain, over 17 years. armfield would later turn to management succeeding brian clough at leeds united and guiding them to the 1975 european cup final, but it was his loyalty to one club which set him apart. jimmy armfield became known as mr blackpool with this statue erected stevan years ago in his honour, a permanent reminder ofa man in his honour, a permanent reminder of a man who contributed so much for
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his town and his country —— seven yea rs his town and his country —— seven years ago. armfield represented england 43 times... a perfect interception. 15 as skipper and was a member of the 1966 world cup winning squad, only for injury to deny him any time on the pitch. when you tell someone you're not playing, you tell someone you're not playing, you have to be fit for the world cup start and i never played again. it is better that we won but is today people look back and say, that they rememberthe people look back and say, that they remember the world cup squad. it is not the same as being in the 11 who played in the point was, it was better that they won. it wasn't until 2009 at armfield received his medal and by then he had taken up summarising for bbc radio and did so for the best part of 40 years, referred to by many as the voice of football. i don't think he ever properly got the credit as a player or manager that he deserved. but do you know what i loved about him? as
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much as anything else, that he maintained his loyalty to blackpool. ina maintained his loyalty to blackpool. in a statement, his family confirmed that he passed away peacefully after a decade—long battle against cancer. the outpouring of tributes reflect the regard in which he was held. jimmy armfield made his mark like few others, he was as popular as they come and will be sorely missed but so fondly remembered. jimmy armfield, who's died at the age of 82. time for a look at the weather.. here's alina jenkins. it will be all change. the trend for something milder is underway. we have the lying snow, it will be starting to thaw and we have lost that feed of cold air, the winds have switched around pushing much milderair have switched around pushing much milder air across the country and we noticed that today, some spells of sunshine in central and eastern parts of england. it looks almost
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springlike outside worthing. it is a fairly quiet evening, mainly dry, a few showers, icy stretches in the north of england and later we look to the west, are neck bowl of wet and windy weather arriving in the west through the night. some strong winds and heavy and persistent rain but a much milder night, at temperatures between 5—9. we have a much more unsettled day tomorrow, strong winds, outbreaks of rain, pushing into these, one way or another we will see rain at some stage. the first belt should clear to leave some sunshine but more showers are never too far away in the afternoon. look at the temperatures, between 9-13. look at the temperatures, between 9—13. parts of wales and england seeing 14 or 15. there is another atlantic system heading our way tomorrow evening, a squeeze in the ice of boris, strong winds, gales, if not severe ones and heavy rain
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pushing east and then we start to see some brighter conditions and colder conditions, though showers perhaps wintry again in scotland but still quite mild. by thursday and friday, it stays quite windy, and mixture of sunshine and showers and while not as cold as recently, it will turn colder again. that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me — this is bbc news. our latest headlines... fresh evidence of the intense strain hospitals across the uk are under as the nhs deals to stay national struggles to deal with winter to respond to future security threats without sufficient investment. the ukip leader henry bolton says he won't quit, despite several members of the party's ruling body resigning in protest over his relationship with his ex—girlfriend. a court hears how a man accused of driving a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in london wanted to kill as many
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